New things I didn't know about Wireguard

Posted on Mon 31 December 2018 in Tech

This is part of my brief series on Wireguard. I'm pretty enamoured with Wireguard and the way it works, and I've been using it pretty seamlessly for over a year now. I've learned a couple things that weren't immediately obvious though, so I'm documenting them here.

Easy Provisioning

Samuel Holland mentioned an interesting trinket, in his post at https://lists.zx2c4.com/pipermail/wireguard/2018-December/003703.html:

"[...] WireGuard will ignore a peer whose public key matches the interface's private key. So you can distribute a single list of peers everywhere."

You can combine this with wg addconf like this:

  • Each peer has its own /etc/wireguard/wg0.conf file, which only contains it's [Interface] section
  • Each peer also has a shared /etc/wireguard/peers.conf file, which contains all the peers
  • The wg0.conf file also has a PostUp hook, calling wg addconf /etc/wireguard/peers.conf

It's up to you to decide how you want to share the peers.conf, be it via a proper orchestration platform, something much more pedestrian like Dropbox, or something kinda wild like Ceph. I dunno, but it's pretty great that you can just wildly fling a peer section around, without worrying whether it's the same as the interface.

Setting Private Key from a file

Another piece of learning, courtesy of Samuel Holland, at https://lists.zx2c4.com/pipermail/wireguard/2018-December/003702.html.

You can read in a file as the Private Key by doing something like:

PostUp = wg set %i private-key /etc/wireguard/wg0.key